LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend Toronto – May 13, 14/17

The LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend

Who: John Richardson

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Room TBA

When: May 13, 14 – 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Price: $495 + HST = $559.35

Registration: See below

Why: Lately I have been receiving a number of calls where people say something like …

I have already taken the LSAT. I have taken this LSAT course or that course. I have used this LSAT tutor or that LSAT tutor, I have used this LSAT book or that book. I am overwhelmed by all the steps and procedures. I need to take the LSAT again, etc, etc, etc.

It’s clear that these people do NOT need a “beginners” LSAT course. What they do need is to learn:

“How to get a larger number of right answers by applying a fewer number of skills.”

Furthermore, the reasons that people have trouble with the LSAT are more related to their reading than to their reasoning. The single most important skill tested on the LSAT is to accurately read and understand the INFORMATION you are expected to then REASON with.

That said, the focus of this weekend will be overwhelmingly on LSAT Logic Games and LSAT Logical Reasoning

But, I would like you to start right now. Here is a post that describes your objective in LSAT preparation and what you must achieve. Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication in both LSAT and in life.

During the weekend, you will learn how to:

– why the LSAT is more of reading test than a reasoning test. In fact, the LSAT really should be called the “READ Test

– identify a smaller number of LSAT skills/techniques that are ALWAYS relevant

– Simplicity is virtue. How to make the complex simple

– learn how to better understand what the LSAT question is telling you and HOW to work with that information (it is not possible to work with all the information that the LSAT throws your way)

– the Logic Games Toolbox (doing more with less)

– adjust the order in which you do the questions

– understand the differences between “diagramming” and “positioning” and how to get started answering questions more quickly

– conditional statements, parallel reasoning and how to better use “conditional statements” (a former president of Law Services call “conditional reasoning” the “basic LSAT reasoning task”) – but watch our for the most common of LSAT mistakes in conditional reasoning

(See my interview with Professor Deborah Bennet: Author of: “Logic Made Easy”)

– how to get your “best guess on record more quickly” (sometimes  you are better off getting a question wrong quickly than getting it right slowly). “Different strokes for different folks.” How your personality type will affect the way that you answer LSAT questions.

– while we are on the topic of personality, there is some evidence that LSAT Prep affects your brain

– why you should NOT categorize LSAT Logical Reasoning questions and what you should ask about all Logical Reasoning questions

– identifying and avoiding the most common LSAT Logical Reasoning flaws

– how to strip LSAT arguments down to their bare essentials (so, what’s an LSAT argument anyway?)

– and more (plus you will actually have a lot of fun) …

My goal is to help you do more with a fewer number of skills that ALWAYS matter.

Pre-Course Prep:

I once wrote a post on “Pre-LSAT Prep” …

But, before the weekend …

1. I urge all attendees to purchase and read “The New Official LSAT SuperPrep” from LSAT. There is a new edition available, but if you can’t get the new edition, the Old “Official LSAT SuperPrep” is fine.

2. I want you to read my list of “Best LSAT Blog Posts“. I have worked hard on them over the years.

Registration – Three ways:

1. Phone VISA or Mastercard: 416 410 7737

2. Eventbrite

3. Email us at: LSATPreparation at gmail dot com

The Official #LSAT SuperPrep Volume II – Strongly suggest that you begin #LSATPrep with this book

The information from the Law Services site includes:

officiallsatsuperprepII

SuperPrep has long been our most comprehensive LSAT preparation book, and SuperPrep II is even better. It is a completely new book that includes 3 complete, practice tests and new explanations for all of the items in those tests; Comparative Reading items and explanations; and new test-taking advice. The practice tests are PrepTest 62 (December 2010 LSAT), PrepTest 63 (June 2011 LSAT), and one test that has never before been disclosed. Also included are answer keys; writing samples; and score-conversion tables; plus invaluable test-taking instructions for help with pacing and timing.

#Lawschool personal statement examples – Chicago and U of T Law School

It’s time for you to consider the Law School Personal Statement.

Personal Statement samples from the the University of Toronto law school:

 

Personal Statement samples from the University of Chicago law school:

Advice from the Berkely Career Center:

#LawSchool Preview -“Take The Bar and Beat Me” by Raymond Woodcock

 

 

Introduction

I have been a “Pre-Law Counsellor” for many years. Over the years I have encountered a number of books of interest to future law students. They include:

“The Good, The Bad and The Ugly”.

Leaving aside “The Bad and The Ugly”, I wanted to share with you  a VERY Good back for Pre-Law students. Actually, can share not only the recommendation, but the book itself.

The book is kind of old (Yes, read it in the 90s). But, it is very good. The book is called:

“Take The Bar and Beat Me”. The author is Raymond Woodcock.

takethebarbookcover

And yes, I received Mr. Woodcock’s kind permission (some years ago) to share the book with you for free.

I hope that you enjoy the book as much as I did.

John

Joint Canada U.S. joint #lawschool degree programs

LW – 2005 Lawyers Weekly Article

For many years I have advocated joint law degrees. There are many different kinds of joint law degree programs. These include:

– Canada U.S. joint law degrees,

– Law school degrees combined with a graduate degree in another discipline.

You will spend three years in law school. Why not pick up another degree along the way.

To be clear, joint law degree programs allow you to earn two degrees. Examples include the joint degree programs offered by:

– the University of Windsor

– the University of Ottawa

and more.

About Non-Canadian law degrees that prepare you for a legal career in Canada

There is a shortage of law schools in Canada. As a result, more and more people are leaving Canada to attend law school. The goal is to return to Canada – go the NCA route – and become admitted to the bar in Canada.

What is the NCA and what role does it play in bar admissions?

You will find basic information here. The question is:

where should one attend law school outside of Canada? For most people, the choice is either the United States or the United Kingdom. Many U.K. law schools market themselves to Canadians. Fewer U.S. law schools market themselves in Canada.

A possible opportunity in Arizona …

 

 

Debt, #lawschool and law school debt – Is there such a thing as good debt?

Debt is a growing problem in all segments of society. Education is expensive and can result in sizable debt. The video referenced in the above tweet is a about a University of Ottawa law student. It’s well worth watching.

Great fun: “Bay Street” by @PhilpSlayton about @PiperFantouche – More #lawyersgonebad

The article in the Globe and Mail includes:

Continue reading

Here is a former Toronto lawyer who always fought for the underdog – rare breed indeed!

On April 19, 2015 the Toronto Star ran a feature on Harry Kypoto. I remember Mr. Kypoto from an earlier time in his career. Whether you liked him or not,  Harry Kypoto was worked hard for his clients.

I am posting this article because it is the story of a man who really did try to make a difference for this clients. Sure me may have made some mistakes. But, he reminds of a time when the practice of law was more of a calling and less or a business. I the Province of Ontario people are still “Called to the bar”.

An excerpt from the article includes:

To his disenfranchised clients, disbarred lawyer Harry Kopyto is a hero figure, willing to take on their cases and fight for what’s right, often for little or no pay. To his critics, he’s publicity-seeking, self-righteous and erratic. Now in his sunset years, he’s still fighting to set the record straight.

 

What exactly should be the requirements to become a licensed lawyer? #LSAT? #LawSchool?

The article referenced in the above tweet continues the discussion of what exactly should be the licensing standard to become a lawyer? This discussion has been prompted largely be the decline in law school applicants in the United States. During the last few years the following questions have been raised:

1. Should the LSAT be required for law school admissions?

2. How long should law school be?

3. What is the role of the bar exam?
Continue reading