Category Archives: LSAT Logical Reasoning

How would you have done @LSATpreparation on the 1959 #LSAT?

There are two kinds of LSAT Historians.

Type 1 – Those who must repeat and repeat the LSAT (the greater number).

Type 2 – “LSAT Scholars” who are fascinated by the LSAT (far fewer).

Every generation thinks it has it harder than the previous generation. Maybe yes. Maybe no.

How would you have performed on the 1959 version of the LSAT? Try some LSAT questions and find out.

LSAT19591960

Introducing LSAT Logical Reasoning – The Terrain @LSATPreparation

Introducing LSAT Logical Reasoning – The Terrain

A study of arguments should be part of any LSAT preparation course.

Introduction – What Skills Does The LSAT Test?

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning in context. Your reading and reasoning skills will tested in the broad  contexts of:

LSAT Logical Reasoning

LSAT Logic Games

LSAT Reading Comprehension
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LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend Toronto – May 13, 14/17

The LSAT Advanced Prep Weekend

Who: John Richardson

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Room TBA

When: May 13, 14 – 9:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Price: $495 + HST = $559.35

Registration: See below

Why: Lately I have been receiving a number of calls where people say something like …

I have already taken the LSAT. I have taken this LSAT course or that course. I have used this LSAT tutor or that LSAT tutor, I have used this LSAT book or that book. I am overwhelmed by all the steps and procedures. I need to take the LSAT again, etc, etc, etc.

It’s clear that these people do NOT need a “beginners” LSAT course. What they do need is to learn:

“How to get a larger number of right answers by applying a fewer number of skills.”

Furthermore, the reasons that people have trouble with the LSAT are more related to their reading than to their reasoning. The single most important skill tested on the LSAT is to accurately read and understand the INFORMATION you are expected to then REASON with.

That said, the focus of this weekend will be overwhelmingly on LSAT Logic Games and LSAT Logical Reasoning

But, I would like you to start right now. Here is a post that describes your objective in LSAT preparation and what you must achieve. Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication in both LSAT and in life.

During the weekend, you will learn how to:

– why the LSAT is more of reading test than a reasoning test. In fact, the LSAT really should be called the “READ Test

– identify a smaller number of LSAT skills/techniques that are ALWAYS relevant

– Simplicity is virtue. How to make the complex simple

– learn how to better understand what the LSAT question is telling you and HOW to work with that information (it is not possible to work with all the information that the LSAT throws your way)

– the Logic Games Toolbox (doing more with less)

– adjust the order in which you do the questions

– understand the differences between “diagramming” and “positioning” and how to get started answering questions more quickly

– conditional statements, parallel reasoning and how to better use “conditional statements” (a former president of Law Services call “conditional reasoning” the “basic LSAT reasoning task”) – but watch our for the most common of LSAT mistakes in conditional reasoning

(See my interview with Professor Deborah Bennet: Author of: “Logic Made Easy”)

– how to get your “best guess on record more quickly” (sometimes  you are better off getting a question wrong quickly than getting it right slowly). “Different strokes for different folks.” How your personality type will affect the way that you answer LSAT questions.

– while we are on the topic of personality, there is some evidence that LSAT Prep affects your brain

– why you should NOT categorize LSAT Logical Reasoning questions and what you should ask about all Logical Reasoning questions

– identifying and avoiding the most common LSAT Logical Reasoning flaws

– how to strip LSAT arguments down to their bare essentials (so, what’s an LSAT argument anyway?)

– and more (plus you will actually have a lot of fun) …

My goal is to help you do more with a fewer number of skills that ALWAYS matter.

Pre-Course Prep:

I once wrote a post on “Pre-LSAT Prep” …

But, before the weekend …

1. I urge all attendees to purchase and read “The New Official LSAT SuperPrep” from LSAT. There is a new edition available, but if you can’t get the new edition, the Old “Official LSAT SuperPrep” is fine.

2. I want you to read my list of “Best LSAT Blog Posts“. I have worked hard on them over the years.

Registration – Three ways:

1. Phone VISA or Mastercard: 416 410 7737

2. Eventbrite

3. Email us at: LSATPreparation at gmail dot com

Toronto Mastering The LSAT Preparation Courses

John Richardson – Mastering The LSAT  – Toronto, Canada – 416 410 7737

Put 30 Years of LSAT Teaching Experience and Law School Admissions Consulting To Work For You!

The only complete LSAT and Law School Application Course!

New Law School Preview Program – Everything you need to know about law school and how to succeed!


Who: John Richardson – Author: Law School Bound and Mastering The LSAT (of the bar of Ontario)

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College

When: Multiple start dates – Courses starting on any of:  November 16, 23, 30

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Toronto LSAT Logic Games Advanced Workshop – Sept. 29/13

 

LSAT October 5, 2013

What: LSAT Logic Games, LSAT Logical Reasoning and Law School Personal Statement Workshop

When: Sunday September 29, 2013 – 10:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Where: University of Toronto – St. Michael’s College – Carr Hall – 100 St. Joseph St. – Room 405

Who: John Richardson

Fee: $195 + HST

Pre-registration IS required. Use this form. Your registration will be confirmed by email.

Part of the LSAT Toolbox – Bad backward reasoning

If you have take a formal logic course, you will recognize this as the logical fallacy of “affirming the consequent“. The LSAT test designers recognize it as a tool to attract you to the wrong answer.

Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words. Here is a nice picture that explains why bad backward reasoning is bad. Hat tip to “LSAT Freedom”.

 

https://twitter.com/LSATFreedom/status/353992324746973185

Bad backward reasoning is one of many components taught in university logic courses. It is an aspect of the proper understanding of “conditional statements”. Listen to my interview  of Professor D. Bennet about her book “Logic Made Easy“.

 

 

 

Listen to internet radio with lawschoolbound on BlogTalkRadio

 

Logic Made Easy – Deborah J. Bennett Interviewed

logicmadeeasy

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning. Many LSAT test takers have difficulty with “LSAT language” and some of the basic logical rules of inference. Deborah J. Bennett is a math professor at New Jersey City University. She is also the author of the book “Logic Made Easy“. “Logic Made Easy” is a very practical and readable book on the principles of logic. I have recommended it to many pre–laws as part of their LSAT prep. During the interview Professor Bennett references questions from  the October 1996 LSAT exam.

The interview also includes a discussion of LSAT quantifiers and the importance of LSAT simplification. As always the LSAT READ Principle shines through by inference. “Logic Made Easy” is a book that can be used through both the  “Pre-LSAT Prep” and LSAT prep process.

The interview is at BlogTalkRadio.

Listen to internet radio with lawschoolbound on Blog Talk Radio

LSAT Logical Reasoning Flaws: The Stuart Trilogy

I came across a nice series of posts on LSAT Logical Reasoning written by Stuart Kovinsky – a very experienced LSAT teacher. Thought I would share them with you in one post.

You should read these posts to gauge your progress in your LSAT prep. If you don’t understand them you are probably NOT ready to take the LSAT. If you do understand these posts then you may be ready to take the LSAT.

Therefore, an understanding of these posts is a (choose choice A or B) condition for being ready to take the LSAT.

A: Necessary

B: Sufficient

The correct answer is A – Necessary.

 

Logical Reasoning: The Dangers of Over-Categorization

Logical Reasoning: The Dangers of Over-Categorization

Is bucketing questions worth your time?Is bucketing logical reasoning questions worth your time?

By John Rood, President of Next Step Test Preparation

One thing that continually amazes me each time I review an LSAT prep book is the huge amount of space spent in categorizing and sub-categorizing question types in logical reasoning. I just flipped through a 2009-edition prep book from one of the big national LSAT prep companies, and it literally had 2 pages devoted to finding assumptions in logical reasoning but over 20 pages explaining each different question type. I can also tell you from experience that categorization is a big part of the curriculum in large LSAT classes.

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