Category Archives: LSAT Logic Games

LSAT Logic Games Webinar – Discoverlaw.org

I highly recommend that you visit  “discoverlaw.org”. It is either run by or in conjunction with the Law School Admission Council (the people who brought you the LSAT).

On Thursday April 28, 2010, Discoverlaw.org conducted  an  “LSAT Prep Webinar” about how to prepare for the Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games) portion of the LSAT.

It was conducted by Lori Davis, who is a senior test specialist at LSAT. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that LSAT has run a seminar dedicated to LSAT preparation. As a long time, LSAT prep class teacher, I was interested to hear what LSAT says about its own test.  I was treated to one hour of  “LSAT on the LSAT”. It was interesting. I made notes and decided to put those notes on my LSAT blog and social media sites. What follows is a summary of the Webinar (both the information given and the my impressions of it) for the benefit of those who were unable to attend. Discoverlaw.org will be running more LSAT prep Webinars.

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LSAT preparation alters your brain, study suggests

 

 

 

Personal “Early Bird” LSAT Prep Start

McMaster Pre-Law Society - Wine and Cheese

 

“Hello John,

Your one piece of advice was more meaningful than any part of the ______  course. I am so thankful that I had the opportunity to talk to you that day.

If you are at all available to meet for one day in Toronto to discuss an overview of general approaches to the LSAT, I think it would be extremely helpful. Please let me know if you are able to meet in January and at what cost it would be.”

______________________________________________________________________

“Hi John,
I just wanted to send you a quick email to say thank-you for a wonderful session this Sunday.  I really found it helpful to have some one on one time with you.  It was so insightful to work with you and learn from your experience.  I would be interested in another individualized session that could address my needs.
I have been working through the materials on my own, but have not seen the same results that I had with you.  I know that there is a session in March, but I would be interested in seeing you before then”
_________________________________________________________________________

Personal “Early Bird Start”:

For  people  taking the June 12, 2012 LSAT we are offering you the  opportunity of a “Personal Early Bird Start”. What does this mean?

You are invited to take a three  hour private session featuring:

– Pre-Law Counseling

– Areas of Pre-LSAT Prep that may be appropriate for you

– Early Bird LSAT Logic Games and Logical Reasoning start

– anything else  that you want to talk  about

This may be done in a live meeting in downtown Toronto or  over the telephone. It  is  scheduled at a time that works for  you.

The cost  is an additional $250 over the cost of the Mastering The LSAT program. In other words the cost  of the Mastering The LSAT program with the “Personal Early Bird”  start is $999 + $250 = $1249.

The personal “Early Bird Start  is available without the taking the Mastering The LSAT course for $499.

To schedule your Private “Early Bird” Start call  416 410 7737.

Note: This is also available as a small group session – a group of friends, etc.

Pre-LSAT Prep – Getting The Most From Your PREP Experience

 

Your LSAT Test Score

What does your LSAT score  measure? Your LSAT test score is a measure of how well you answer LSAT questions (on that particular test day). What does  a high LSAT score mean? A high LSAT test score means  that the person reads well. It is probable that a low LSAT scorer does not read well (although there are a number of other factors that might contribute to a low score). This makes sense because the LSAT is a test of how well you apply your reading and reasoning skills to LSAT questions. In a previous post, I suggested that the LSAT should be called the “R.E.A.D.” test (Reading Effectively and Deducing).

The Two Kinds of LSAT Preparation

“Formal LSAT preparation” = the process of specifically learning to improve the application of your reading and reasoning skills to actual LSAT tests, for the purpose of achieving your maximum  LSAT score

“Informal LSAT preparation” = the process of improving your general level of reading and reasoning skills so that you are starting your “Formal LSAT preparation” from a higher general level of reading and reasoning Continue reading

LSAT Logic Games – 8 Essential Skills

Welcome To LSAT Logic Games Dot Calm

The LSAT is a test of reading and reasoning in three different contexts. One of the contexts is called “Analytical Reasoning” or “Logic Games” (LSAT Logical Reasoning and LSAT Reading Comprehension are the other two contexts).

Many LSAT test  takers  experience a high degree of anxiety with the LSAT Logic Games. The good news is that  Logic Games is quite susceptible  to short term improvement.

Reading and Reasoning – The Two Fundamental  Aspects

Reading – Understanding the conditions in Logic Games

Reasoning – Making inferences  with the reasoning that you understand

More people have trouble with the reading and understanding of the conditions than with making inferences  from the conditions.

LSAT  Reality – Time Is A Wasting – You Need to Get Started

Any LSAT teacher or book can explain the answers to Logic Games questions after the fact. Although this has some value,  it is irrelevant. The real  problem is that people either don’t know how to get started or take  so long getting started that they run out of time. You must learn to proceed without the confidence even when you are uncomfortable.

Logic Games – The LSAT Perspective

In April of 2010, Lori Davis, a senior test designer at LSAT, offered a webinar on LSAT Analytical Reasoning. It was very interesting – I wrote a summary of of it.  Read about the Logic Games Webinar here.

Some Basic LSAT Logic Games Skills

Skill 1 – How To Accurately Understand The Conditions Continue reading

LSAT Logic Games Webinar – Discoverlaw.org

Posted on April 28, 2010 by admin

I highly recommend that you visit  “discoverlaw.org”. It is either run by or in conjunction with the Law School Admission Council (the people who brought you the LSAT).

On Thursday April 28, 2010, Discoverlaw.org conducted  an  “LSAT Prep Webinar” about how to prepare for the Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games) portion of the LSAT.

It was conducted by Lori Davis, who is a senior test specialist at LSAT. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that LSAT has run a seminar dedicated to LSAT preparation. As a long time, LSAT prep class teacher, I was interested to hear what LSAT says about its own test.  I was treated to one hour of  “LSAT on the LSAT”. It was interesting. I made notes and decided to put those notes on my LSAT blog and social media sites. What follows is a summary of the Webinar (both the information given and the my impressions of it) for the benefit of those who were unable to attend. Discoverlaw.org will be running more LSAT prep Webinars. Continue reading