Tag Archives: John Richardson

The LSAT, Law School Admission, and Role The LSAT Plays in Law School Admission

The LSAT, Law School Admission, and Role The LSAT Plays in Law School Admission

John Richardson, Toronto Canada

The LSAT  is required by almost every law school in the United States and Canada. (It is interesting that the law schools in Michigan, Illinois and Alabama have not required the LSAT in certain circumstances. It is unclear how this is consistent with the ABA
rules.)

Let’s begin with some sentiment  from the mainstream media:

“Yet it’s well-known among law school applicants that many Canadian schools sort their applications into piles by LSAT score and simply axe off those below a certain percentile. How many brilliant future lawyers are lost below that line, who, for one reason or another, simply can’t handle the LSAT?

It seems to me that there’s some room here for a Canadian law school to set itself apart by announcing a new, more holistic approach to admissions by waiving the LSAT requirement and perhaps doing something like having admissions interviews, which no Canadian law school does, instead, on top of using references and personal statements and extra-curriculars and undergraduate performance. If not for a whole
entering class, then perhaps schools could set aside a certain portion of first-year seats for applicants that do not require the LSAT, like the University of Michigan law school did in 2008. Continue reading

LSAT Releases Ten New Actual LSAT Tests With Comparative Reading

When you prepare for the LSAT it is essential to use actual LSAT questions. The individual test books are available for purchase from LSAT. The most economical way to purchase the tests is in books of 10. At the present time LSAT has released:

– 10 Actual LSATs  (Tests 9 – 18)

– 10 More Actual LSATs (Tests 19 – 28)

– The Next 10  Actual LSATs (Tests 29 – 38)

In September 2009, I blogged that LSAT would be releasing a new book of 10 LSATs.

The wait is over – just in time for you to prepare for the June 6, 2011 LSAT. I just receive an email from Amazon announcing that on March 1, 2011, LSAT will  be releasing:

Ten New Actual Official LSAT PrepTests with Comparative Readings

This book will be essential for your LSAT Preparation. We are including it with all of our Toronto LSAT Preparation Courses. It includes LSAT PrepTests 52 – 61 which are the LSAT tests from September 2007 to October 2010. The June 2007 LSAT is available as a free free LSAT download from Law Services.

LSAT Logic Games Webinar – Discoverlaw.org

Posted on April 28, 2010 by admin

I highly recommend that you visit  “discoverlaw.org”. It is either run by or in conjunction with the Law School Admission Council (the people who brought you the LSAT).

On Thursday April 28, 2010, Discoverlaw.org conducted  an  “LSAT Prep Webinar” about how to prepare for the Analytical Reasoning (Logic Games) portion of the LSAT.

It was conducted by Lori Davis, who is a senior test specialist at LSAT. To the best of my knowledge, this is the first time that LSAT has run a seminar dedicated to LSAT preparation. As a long time, LSAT prep class teacher, I was interested to hear what LSAT says about its own test.  I was treated to one hour of  “LSAT on the LSAT”. It was interesting. I made notes and decided to put those notes on my LSAT blog and social media sites. What follows is a summary of the Webinar (both the information given and the my impressions of it) for the benefit of those who were unable to attend. Discoverlaw.org will be running more LSAT prep Webinars. Continue reading

Your “chances of getting into law school”

Two weeks ago I spent a week doing free LSAT seminars for pre-law students. We spend lots of time talking about law school applications and getting into law school. Many students spend lots of time asking “what are my chances of getting into law school?” Don’t spend your time wondering about your chances. Do spend your time improving your chances.

At the end of this seminar series, I did an email interview about my Law School Bound.  I found myself thinking: What is the single most important piece of advice that you would give to a pre-law student? Here are my thoughts.

The easiest way to gain admission to law school is to NOT concentrate on getting into law school per se. The primary factor that will determine where you attend law school is your grades. Grading is a competitive and relative evaluation. The people who get the highest grades are the people who like the course the best. If you don’t like your courses you will not get good grades.

The best way to get good grades is to enjoy your courses.  Once you find an area of study that you like, you should then make it your goal to get into graduate school in that area of study. If you can get into graduate school you can get into law school. In fact you should carry your undergraduate interests into law school. Not only is there no such thing as a pre-law program, there is no area of study that cannot be carried into law school. For example, if you study economics as an undergraduate student, you can carry that interest into law school. Antitrust law is more about economics than it is about law.

The moral of the story is – be happy and the rest will take care of itself!

John Richardson